Forget Diesel, drive on water!

Ongoing discussion of anything not related to Nissans or diesels.

Moderators:goglio704, Nissan_Ranger, kassim503

Post Reply
User avatar
dieseldorf
Posts:190
Joined:13 years ago
Location:Oracle, AZ
Forget Diesel, drive on water!

#1

Post by dieseldorf » 12 years ago

On the CBS Evening news, a japanese car was shown that runs on water. One liter water lasts for 80 miles. Top speed 80 mph 8)
You can build this car too, Well, a similar car. Here are the plans:
http://www.hasslberger.com/tecno/hydrogen.html
Astro Van with LD28 propulsion
'84 Mercedes 190D 2.2L 5-Speed Manual purchased 06/12 SOLD 06/13
'86 Ford Escort Wagon Diesel MT Sold 07-17-08

User avatar
asavage
Site Admin
Posts:5351
Joined:15 years ago
Location:Duvall, Wash.
Contact:

#2

Post by asavage » 12 years ago

Well, I'm nothing like well-educated on this, but let me throw a fly in the ointment.

Referring to a fragment of a diagram linked from http://www.hasslberger.com/tecno/hydrogen.html :

Image

I don't know much about making hydrogen on-the-go, but I do know a few things about IMPCO mixers and regulators, and this won't work. The IMPCO mixer is a demand-regulated device. It requires that the gas be available at enough pressure to assure fast delivery in response to demand, and that diagram shows no pressure reservoir (nor a mechanism to develop substantial pressure).

Also, the item called out as, "IMPCO low pressure regulator", I wonder what that is? The most common IMPCO regulators are for the LPG market and vaporize liquid propane (at a max of 250 PSI, not usually considered low pressure). These include the IMPCO Model E, Model J, and I think the Model N. The output of these is about 1.5" negative pressure demand. That is, the mixer (replaces the carb, or sits on top of it, depending on the model and installation) provides 1.5" of draw on the vaporiser/regulator. But the input to the Model E is designed to be at the LPG tank pressure, and I don't see this diagram's design coming up to enough pressure to do any good.

Next, I'd like someone to do the work that I'm too lazy to do: run the rough calcs on how many watts would be required to split enough water to satisfy the demand of a 5.7l engine turning at 4000 RPM at WOT. I'm sure that if I spent a couple of hours, I could find the relevant data and crunch it, but from the seat-of-my-pants, a Delcotron isn't going to get there, not even close.

But I'm willing to learn new things -- if it doesn't hurt too much.
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.

User avatar
dieseldorf
Posts:190
Joined:13 years ago
Location:Oracle, AZ

#3

Post by dieseldorf » 12 years ago

I think this design is just a rough idea, not a working plan.
I offer the idea, but not the design, because many aspects must be considered, such as: the least amount of back pressure, unit pressure, unit placement with regard to configuration by the limit or abundance of that space - though this one would be constructed for a stationary, engine-powered electrical generator, where space limitation is of no concern.
The electrolysis process generates hydrogen and oxygen gases that must be separated. In this design it is unclear how it is accomplished. Pure water does not or barely conduct current. An aiding agent must be added. No word on that either.
However, there are already hydrogen kits to buy that supposedly work.
http://www.hydrogencarsnow.com/hydrogen ... s-cars.htm
Astro Van with LD28 propulsion
'84 Mercedes 190D 2.2L 5-Speed Manual purchased 06/12 SOLD 06/13
'86 Ford Escort Wagon Diesel MT Sold 07-17-08

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests