Cam Bearing removal

SD diesels were widely available in the US in the 1981-86 Datsun/Nissan 720 pickups, and in Canada through '87 in the D21 pickup.

Moderators: plenzen, Nissan_Ranger

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dangrrangr
Posts: 13
Joined: 10 years ago
Location: Vallonia, IN

Cam Bearing removal

#1

Post by dangrrangr »

On cam bearing removal. should they be driven towards the back of the block ? and is there any tools that will work besides a cam bearing tool?
dangrrangr yes i have a 91' ford ranger with a sd22 engine out of a fork lift and 720 5 speed tranny :)
dangrrangr
Posts: 13
Joined: 10 years ago
Location: Vallonia, IN

#2

Post by dangrrangr »

i thought this forum was to help and give information and discuss things over this certain engine. i dont understand how everyone else's questions are answered. but not mine? guess this is a calling to get rid of this little engine.
dangrrangr yes i have a 91' ford ranger with a sd22 engine out of a fork lift and 720 5 speed tranny :)
dangrrangr
Posts: 13
Joined: 10 years ago
Location: Vallonia, IN

#3

Post by dangrrangr »

i thought this forum was to help and give information and discuss things over this certain engine. i dont understand how everyone else's questions are answered. but not mine? guess this is a calling to get rid of this little engine.
dangrrangr yes i have a 91' ford ranger with a sd22 engine out of a fork lift and 720 5 speed tranny :)
plenzen
Posts: 869
Joined: 14 years ago
Location: Cochrane Alberta Canada

#4

Post by plenzen »

Don't think that anyone is ignoring you, perhaps no one has removed/replaced cam bushings.

According to my FSM for “SD25” it states:
1. Remove rear plug. (drive out rear of block from inside with long drift.)
2. Remove camshaft bushing with tool. Remove bushing from front side of engine
3. Install new bushings with Tool following reverse order of removal
(a.) Align cylinder block oil passage hole and bushing oil hole
(b.) Install bushing with beveled end facing front
( this would indicate to me they are installed from rear to front although the picture is not all that clear, but the bevel end will allow for easier starting in the bore)
4. Check camshaft bushing clearance.
5. Install the new rear plug using a liquid sealer. ( new plug is installed from outside rear of engine )
It also indicates that there are three different sizes in camshaft bushings.
In the case of the SD 25 (SD22 may be different) the front is the larger with the next size in the middle and the smallest at the rear of engine.
As for a tool for removal/install I guess your imagination will dictate what you can use.
If you have an expendable deep socket and a long expendable extension (you may swedge over the end from pounding on it) that may work. Or use a brass hammer so as not to damage the extension. Take the new cam bushings along with the expendable socket to a machine shop and get them to step machine the socket to fit in each bushing. ( smallest diameter at the front of socket then the next then the largest ) I seen that used in the past and the long extension will allow you to pass through the block and put the socket on the end once inside. Use some EOS or white lithium grease on the bushing to help them slide in without galling the sides. We used to use some white lead for that but you can’t buy it anymore.
I can send you the clearances and specs for the camshaft ( bend, end play etc ) that I have but it's for an SD 25 and not sure it is the same camshaft in the 22

HTH

Paul


The forum has been pretty quiet these past few weeks as well so ????

EDIT:
Just did a bit more pondering on this and I recall a long time ago I used two pieces of 1/4 inch flat bar about 1"X2" +/- with a 3/8" hole through the center of both of them and long bolt ( 3" or so ) and nut and washers. I put the bushings in a freezer and warmed the block with a propane torch ( not too hot but about 100 degrees or so) , painted some lube in the holes and started the beveled end of the bushing with the oil hole lined up. I put one piece of flat bar against the bushing and one against the block on the other side and inserted the bolt and just squeezed them in. I had to sink the bushings about 1/64th further in from flush to center them in the bores and for the oil holes to line up perfectly. I simply used the old cam bushing from that particular spot with the non beveled end as a counter sink and backed the bolt out and placed it against the end of the new bushing and squeezed it slightly to push the new bushing into place. Worked pretty well

Just make sure you get the right bushing in the right spot or you will be very sad when the cam wont go in. I know the ID dimensions are different but not certain if the OD dimensions are different so, they may all fit in the block but in the wrong order, and that will cause a bit of drama when you have to get them out without damaging them. A bit of potty mouth too I suspect.

I am pretty certain someone else will come up with another idea but that is my $0.02 worth
Paul
Retired Pauly
Problem with being retired is that you never get a day off.
1987 D21-J SD25 KC
KJLGD21FN
dangrrangr
Posts: 13
Joined: 10 years ago
Location: Vallonia, IN

#5

Post by dangrrangr »

Thank you for the reply! okay. i wasnt sure on this engine because i have had some others it didnt matter which way the bearings were drove. thanksfor your help!!
dangrrangr yes i have a 91' ford ranger with a sd22 engine out of a fork lift and 720 5 speed tranny :)
plenzen
Posts: 869
Joined: 14 years ago
Location: Cochrane Alberta Canada

#6

Post by plenzen »

Good Luck and have fun

P
Retired Pauly
Problem with being retired is that you never get a day off.
1987 D21-J SD25 KC
KJLGD21FN
Nissan_Ranger
Posts: 267
Joined: 14 years ago
Location: Canada

#7

Post by Nissan_Ranger »

Thanks for helping him, Paul. For all the time I've had my SDs, I've never had to do any major work on them:-)

Andy
The old 'six gun' was as popular as the cell phone in its time and just as annoying when it went off in the Theater.
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