Maxima locks, keys, and keycode

General information about the first-generation Nissan Maxima in the US. What was the Datsun 810 became the luxury leader Maxima in the US in 1981.

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asavage
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Maxima locks, keys, and keycode

#1

Post by asavage » 13 years ago

I had to cut a new key for my '83, and "discovered" that both my wagons have the key code on the glovebox lid. Makes originating (creating an orginal key) easy. My reference says that the code is also often stamped into the passenger side door lock body, so if your sticker (or glovebox door) is missing, you might be able to get the key code by pulling the lock body. In that case, the last four numbers might be on the lock's tailpiece. As an example, my keycode was X0692; the four numbers for 1983 can be 1-8000. The keycode will always begine with "X".

I work for/as a locksmith these days. If anybody is using a worn original or a poor copy that works bad, I can cut a new key for you. The generic advice is to not use the original key (whether the OEM original, or an originated key), but to keep it safe and use it to make copies only. The Nissan keys wear fairly fast, and are known to break if you have one or more deep cuts.

[Trivia: Nissan locks & keys are pretty much interchangeable with Subarus of that era.]

We get $20 to originate a key from the code. Figure on $3 to ship it back to you, and $3 per duplicate -- and you'll want one or two dupes. Fifty cents more for plastic head dupes.

I'm just throwing this out there, I'm not really drumming up business, but not all locksmiths will cut keys from code anymore, some won't buy the software etc. We do, and can.
Last edited by asavage 13 years ago, edited 2 times in total.
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.

diesel-man
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#2

Post by diesel-man » 13 years ago

Al:
I have been getting keys from the dealer for years for Maxi's. They cut it with a mechanical hand held cutter. (I'm sure you've seen it) A code cut key is the only way to go.

Anyhow, just wondering what you think of your 83 OD tranny? Isn't it wonderful? The 83 sedan I drive needs a little help getting into second each time, so I shift it into 2nd from drive @ about 17mph. It has been this way for about 45K. The other 83 OD has a similar problem when it is cold.

Thanks for so much info on Biodiesel. I had done some searching on the subject a while back but was only wondering about your experience w/BD. I got on the Biodieselnow site and it is a little overwhelming. (especially the Thermo poly...........) I'm sure BD is easier than it appears. It is a shame that there is not a better outlet for the waste glycerine.

I was looking over the Server status page and was wondering if you have ever heard of rebuilt batteries? I have been buying reconditioned car batteries for coming up four years. I get a recon battery from my Interstate battery dealer for $21 (with an exchange) and they seem every bit as reliable as a new battery. (any batteries that I get dead, new or rebuilt, I send back) I use size 31 batteries in our Maxi's which is the same size you would find in a Kenworth, but I only fit one!! I have to use longer hold down bolts and move it over a little so it doesn't hit the hood yet not get too close to the power steering pulley. Since diesels need to crank fast when cold, you need a lot of reserve power, and I have had good service with them. I stopped selling new batteries for the most part because Sam's is offering 108 mo batteries, Costco 84 mo batteries and possibly they may actually make it that far, but I am unwilling to stand behind a battery for over 60 mos. I sell recon batteries and make just as much money (per battery) and for the price, someone wouldn't be upset if it only went 4 yrs.

I have no idea what it costs to provide us with this "place" to get together, but thank you!! :D

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#3

Post by kassim503 » 13 years ago

never heard of a rebuilt or reconditioned battery, im pretty sure its possible but not alot can be reused
'83 maxima sedan, l24e, a/t, black

227K SOLD 6/7/2012

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Re: Maxima locks, keys, and keycode

#4

Post by glenlloyd » 13 years ago

asavage wrote:I had to cut a new key for my '83, and "discovered" that both my wagons have the key code on the glovebox lid. Makes originating (creating an orginal key) easy. My reference says that the code is also often stamped into the passenger side door lock body, so if your sticker (or glovebox door) is missing, you might be able to get the key code by pullling the lock body. In that case, the last four numbers might be on the lock's tailpiece. As an example, my keycode was X0692; the four numbers for 1983 can be 1-8000.
I noticed this as well, on a tag on the glove box door. It also matches the code on the only original key I have for my car. I had spares made from the original and tend to use those instead of the lone original key.

sa
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#5

Post by asavage » 13 years ago

diesel-man wrote:I have been getting keys from the dealer for years for Maxi's. They cut it with a mechanical hand held cutter. (I'm sure you've seen it)
Actually, I haven't. I've got a rig like that for cutting high-security Best keys, but even that isn't really "hand-held", more like "portable" (requires a flat surface), but it isn't powered. It nibbles the cuts. My duplicators and originator are powered cutters, and are a lot more versatile than a nibbler. With an originator, I can also remove the nubbins between cuts, reducing cylinder/wafer wear.
Anyhow, just wondering what you think of your 83 OD tranny?


I haven't got the driveshaft reconnected -- I unbolted it at the diff's companion flange before tow-dollying it, and it's parked outside in a dirt area and it's raining sideways. I'll push it into the shop sometime this week and reconnect it, but I still need to check out the brakes -- I won't trust brakes that have sat, and the reservoir was dry.

Then there's registration, and I have to get a new LR side window (wagon) to keep the weather out better than the taped plastic sheet. And like that. But I am looking forward to the OD. My '82 does seem a bit rev'd at highway speeds, but then again it was designed for it. OD will be nice, though.
I get a recon battery from my Interstate battery dealer for $21 (with an exchange) and they seem every bit as reliable as a new battery.
Is this an Interstate product? I was an Interstate dealer, and I don't recall "rebuilt" ever coming up.
[Group 31] I have had good service with them. I stopped selling new batteries for the most part because Sam's is offering 108 mo batteries, Costco 84 mo batteries and possibly they may actually make it that far, but I am unwilling to stand behind a battery for over 60 mos. I sell recon batteries and make just as much money (per battery) and for the price, someone wouldn't be upset if it only went 4 yrs.
True, as far as it goes.

The Costco battery is a Johnson Controls unit, and they have a terrible rep with me. Not as bad as Exide, but not very good. I still use them (the ones I still own) because I always get a good pro-rata discount when I turn them in, but I won't buy new ones anymore. I only warrantied maybe three Interstate batteries in three years, and that's a very good rate IMO.

I'll have to look into putting a 31 in the '83. I can't see its future just yet.
I have no idea what it costs to provide us with this "place" to get together, but thank you!! :D
I run the server for other purposes anyway, and the DSL is an overhead expense; the software is open-source, so the only cost is my time, really. Since the LD28 is one of my hobbies, it all fits.
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.

diesel-man
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#6

Post by diesel-man » 13 years ago

Al:
The handheld code cutter has like 8 or 10 (height adjust arms? one for each different level on the key) and it nibbles the key away. That is a good way to describe it.

The rebuilt batteries are "pulse charged" to desulphate the plates. Do a google search for Solargizer, pulse charger, and "Diary of a Snow Shoveler". I cannot explain the desulphate process...I understand it, but can't tell you how to get there from here!! I guess Interstate isn't the ones pulse charging them if you do not have them at your dealer. I made "friends" with the guy at Interstate and he said they make as much on the recon batteries as the new ones. They have a label on top ECONO and they "brand" each battery with a date code of when you buy it. They come with a thirty day warranty ($21 remember) but I only had to eat one so far. I sell them for $46 so I only lost my profit on the one.

The plates get a "crust" on them from the chemical reaction taking place and it gets thicker and harder so the battery has less capacity. Like running down the street with a bag over your head... if you could get just a few holes ripped into it, you might make it to the end of the block. I do know that it works. (check it out)
Wayne

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Keyway variations

#7

Post by asavage » 13 years ago

This post is just for me to document -- for myself -- the keyway variations.

A JY 1982 Wagon had a keycode of M6918 = bitting (311333), a six-bit key which surprised me. Blank is DA23/X115

My 1982 Wagon has a keycode of X5125, eight bit. Blank is the more common DA25/X123

My 1983 Wagon has keycode of X0692, eight-bit.

The Ign. assy from a JY Wagon has keycode Y1843 = bitting (13311221), eight-bit, and came cut on a DA23 but CodeSource says it should be cut on a valet blank DA28/X124 -- I don't know if Gen1 Maximas use a valet key, have to look that up in the Owner's Manual. [later] The 1983 OM (pg 4) shows a valet key that does not open the tailgate/trunk or glovebox, but does open the fuel filler flap.

Image Image

As you can see, the early (X115) and late (X123) keyways aren't really even similar, but they're kind of interchangeable anyway, due to the locks' keyway milling. I don't recommend interchanging them, but it's interesting nonetheless.

[later edit]
A newer variation on the X123 blank is the DA31P. Same keyway as the X123, used on newer Nissans and will fit the '83-84 Maxima.
Image
Last edited by asavage 12 years ago, edited 1 time in total.
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.

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asavage
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#8

Post by asavage » 13 years ago

Sample keycode in Nissan glovebox.
Image
Last edited by asavage 12 years ago, edited 1 time in total.
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.

dlh
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#9

Post by dlh » 13 years ago

The common hand held code cutter is called curtis clipper.

Schlage has one for their blanks, but needs a flat surface.
Image
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asavage
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#10

Post by asavage » 13 years ago

The one shown in your pic is for Falcon/BEST keys, we have one of those, and as you say it's not hand-held. It is fairly accurate, but I don't like it because I can't use it in the field to reduce or eliminate "nubbins" (peaks of unnecessary metal between cuts), and BEST keys esp. have very large nubbins that can interfere with smooth insertion/removal.

Nubbins wear out locks faster, but also help retain the key when the lock is turned, as in an ignition switch. You have to be careful about nubbin removal for an automotive key for this reason. We have a couple of industry-standard HPC 1200s for general-purpose originating work, and in general I like them because they are flexible and are easy to setup -- and I change the setup several times/day. The one I use the most tends to cut Schlage 'C' cuts too high, but that's easily compensated.

I use a Rytan and an Ilco for general-purpose duplication. I'm not really in the market for the hand-held punch units, after having used our Falcon/BEST unit. I esp. don't like the blank clamp, it's very easy to have the blank pop out (scrapping the blank, and BEST blanks aren't cheap), and even when clamped correctly, the blank has too much flex when punching. The anvil doesn't appear to be optimized for the BEST blanks. I'll clamp an 'A' blank OK -- not great, but OK -- but the 'D' and 'G' blanks are kind of tricky to clamp well. Not my favourite tool.
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.

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#11

Post by asavage » 13 years ago

Generic pictures of 1982 Maxima Ignition/Lock assy:

Image Image Image Image Image

I've found that the Maxima assy can be installed on the 720 (I put an '83 assy on an '86 720).
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.

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#12

Post by asavage » 12 years ago

I usually can find a keycode somewhere to cut a new key, but sometimes I can't. Such is the case when I buy a used Ign. lock assy at a JY; Nissans after 1983 usually don't have the code in the glovebox, and at the JY the pass. door is often missing, so I can't get it off that lock body either, the only two places on the vehicle where keycodes are located on Nissans.

I bought a couple of 720 Ign. lock assys at the JY in the last few weeks, none with codes. The 720 and Maxima locks are nearly identical.

In order to make a key (leaving aside impressioning) I have to take it apart. Nissan Ign. locks of this vintage use a solid or roll pin retainer.

Up to 1982, the locks are 6-pin (wafers) and use the Ilco X6 key blank.
From 1983-on, the locks are 8-pin (wafers) and use the Ilco X123 blank.
This lock is the later style, with eight wafers.

Here is the finished lock:
Image


When a key is to be made by reading the wafers directly, the face cap must be removed, which involves gentle prying; it will usually be re-used. After the face cap is removed, the lock housing pin must be removed.
Image

For a solid pin, and for some roll pins, I drill a parallel hole in the outer housing, with a slight angle toward the pin, then using a hard pointed tool, lever the pin up enough to grab it with bullnose cutters.
Image Image



After removing the pin, carefully slide the lock out of the outer housing. Halfway out, be prepared to catch this little spring. It's not under a lot of tension, but it will escape if you're not watching.
Image


At this point, I usually take all the parts to the sink and clean them, using small brushes and a water-based cleaner.
Image Image



To remove the lock core from the lock housing (inner housing, that is), use a pointed tool to depress the core's retaining wafer, then pull the core from the housing. You'll have to wiggle the core a bit while pulling on it, but it will come out if you depress the retaining wafer.
Image



After removing the core from the inner housing, clean the core & the wafers.


Image Image


That last picture is with a key blank inserted. "Reading" the wafers in this context means looking at the relative heights that they project above (and below) the lock core, and noting the best guess at the discrete depths of each vs. spacing.
Image

I make a chart, number the heading (spacings) one through eight, and under each write my best guess as to the wafer's depth.

Spacing: No. 1 is closest to the key end of the lock core (or the bow end of the key); No. 8 is the tip of the key and the closed end of the lock.

Depths: the possibilities for the X123 and this lock are depths one through four, with one being almost a "no cut", shallowest. The wafer which projects almost not at all with an uncut blank inserted is a one depth. Notice this fits the No. 1 space: it is almost perfect with the uncut blank inserted. The "tallest" projecting wafer is a four depth on this lock. Given those two extremes, you can guess pretty well the other depths, and then it's just a matter of writing them down.

The "bitting" (spacing plus depth) of the core above is: (1334 2322). I guessed it right first try.


I cut a new key, trial fitted it, and then greased the core and reinserted it into the lock's inner housing:
Image Image Image


Now it's time to fit up the key minder mechanism, the follower, lever, axle, and tension spring that activate the key minder switch that operates the buzzer.
Image
Image
Image Image



Now it's time to install the lock into the outer housing. Put a couple drops of your favorite lube on the cam at the bottom of the well (I use and recommend Tri-Flow):
Image


Holding the key minder lever in place, partially insert the lock into the housing. Do not fully insert it yet.
Image


The key minder tension spring must be manually compressed a bit while sliding the lock into the housing:
Image Image



Before inserting the lock further, align the key minder switch blade with the follower's slot, whilst pushing the lock in just a tad further.
Image Image


When a key is inserted, the follower pushes the switch blade, closing the switch's contacts.
Image


Push the lock home, then install the roll pin. Just tap it in place. Add a bit of epoxy to the end of the roll pin if you wish.
Image Image


I put a bit of Teflon grease where the key minder follower rides.
Image


Replacement face caps are still available. I elected to re-use the old one for this lock.
Image Image Image

===================================================================

720 pickups:
The early (through '82) & late ('83-86) steering lock assemblies (the whole thing) are slightly different from each other. The late ones ('83-on) seem to be the same -- exteriour dimensions -- as all the Maximas. The Maxima unit seem to be able to bolt on to any 720 and work. The key buzzer wires on the Maxima/late 720 units can be ignored if the assy. is installed on an early 720.

However, the Maxima (and late 720) steering locks use the X123 keyway (eight cut) instead of the X6/X7 keyway (six cut) and the lock escutcheon is slightly larger on the X123 units, so the early 720 column plastic won't fit over the lock. I suspect that one could file the plastic and get it to fit, but I haven't had the opportunity to try.

(click on any image for larger)
Image Image Image Image Image
Last edited by asavage 11 years ago, edited 4 times in total.
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.

Carimbo
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"Popped" Trunk Lock Cylinder

#13

Post by Carimbo » 12 years ago

Hi,

The trunk lock was casualty to petty theft/vandalism last weekend. Looks like they used a large screwdriver and hammer. Whoever it was, they stole my handtools and flashlight. Now I have to hope my car does not break down, especially in the dark!

Image
Image

Lock seems to work normally w/ key; I tried (somewhat gingerly) to open it with a screwdriver but could not get it to open.

What do I need to repair this damage?

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#14

Post by asavage » 12 years ago

I have new face caps; I don't know if I have a new shutter . . . no, it's not available separately from the lock core for the truck lock. Also, the trunk lock has a different part No. from the door lock, though the face cap is the same.

What that means is that I'd have to buy the whole lock to do a proper repair, because I can't repair the shutter, and without that part in working condition, lots of weather and crap gets in the lock. And I can't tell if the shutter from a door lock would work, and I don't have any dead Nissan door locks to rip apart to check (though I have a set of working 720 door locks with a matching Ign. lock).

The trunk lock is still available in the aftermarket, retail is $40 for it, and it comes with keys (it's a coded lock: I can't buy one uncoded). You can buy it from any locksmith that can order Auto Security Products, the number is ASP B-16-107 (ASP has a large warehouse in Seattle).

But then you're stuck with a different key for the trunk. We get $30 to rekey a Nissan lock of this type, which requires that the old face cap be destroyed to open up the lock, and a new face cap installed when finished (which is why I have the face caps in stock!).

Alternatively, if you can get a used truck lock, I can rekey it for you for the same price: $30, including a new key. I would have to have your car's keycode or an existing key to do that. Again, any locksmith that does automotive work can do this kind of thing -- many locksmiths have dropped auto work.

-------------------------

Unrelated Q: my parts lookup is showing a lock that looks like it's a pushbutton lock for 1983-84. Can somebody with an '83 or '84 Sedan take a picture of their truck lock for me (inside and out, if possible)?
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.

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kassim503
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Location: Stony Brook, NY

#15

Post by kassim503 » 12 years ago

You probably need a new trunk lock- thats what I did when vandals ripped my trunk open to get into the goodies inside many years ago. At least they didnt annihilate your trunk lid while doing it, they mangled my trunk lid around it- ill snap a pic of it someday, its like they just took a crowbar and ripped the lock's cyl straight out.

How do you open a lock with a screwdriver like that? I see it on infomercials and tv all the time like its nothing- and when I tried it out on a toyota Camry I was parting out, all I wound up doing was breaking the lock so the key didnt work anymore :lol: I guess you can see that I havnt stolen a car in my lifetime
'83 maxima sedan, l24e, a/t, black

227K SOLD 6/7/2012

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