This is The Bomb ... with Turbo!

SD diesels were widely available in the US in the 1981-86 Datsun/Nissan 720 pickups, and in Canada through '87 in the D21 pickup.

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Dale
Posts: 19
Joined: 8 years ago

#151

Post by Dale » 7 years ago

What's your EGT look like? I have my fueling on my NA turned down to the point it barely smokes at all, and I cant accelerate to 55mph on flat ground without hitting 500C, and just maintaining 65mph runs me over 450-500C

elboss
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Location: Portugal

#152

Post by elboss » 7 years ago

EGT? :oops:

Nissan_Ranger
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Location: Canada

#153

Post by Nissan_Ranger » 7 years ago

Exhaust Gas Temperature...

N_R
The old 'six gun' was as popular as the cell phone in its time and just as annoying when it went off in the Theater.

elboss
Posts: 59
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Location: Portugal

#154

Post by elboss » 7 years ago

thanks! I dont know, my EGT, but i run with full boost... you can see the smoke here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaxDcYz7 ... 7TARq7z0Bg

diesel doer
Posts: 3
Joined: 13 years ago
Location: winnipeg, manatoba

2.2&2.5 turbo

#155

Post by diesel doer » 7 years ago

I've been following your postings with interest, and decided to chime in. I've been running turbo's on a 2.2 and on a 2.5 for about 100,000 k's each with no failure, but I only run 8lbs boost with an intercooler. and find that for every degree that you drop the intake temp, you get about the same on th EGT's. I've been using the turbo's from the old Chrysler 2.2 engines , intercooler from the Renault fuego as they are cheap and plentiful here, but a little big, so slow on spool up but gets rid of the smoke on cruze and less on acceleration.I've never lost a head gasket yet, Have you tried reducing the advance some? Most vehicle manufaturers with na and turbo versions of the same engine run less initial advance on the turbo engines.

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Knucklehead
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Location: Phoenix

#156

Post by Knucklehead » 7 years ago

Wow. I didn't know this site was still running.

Things still work fine. Haven't made any further changes except having the IP rebuilt. Veg oil is not nice. $1000.

I still recommend a turbo, but only if you like tinkering. If not, why is anyone looking at this site?
'82 standard cab 3 axle SD22 turbo
'89 int'l 9700 Cummins 444 (855 ci)
'29 HD FD export model

Cmdr.Ron
Posts: 15
Joined: 9 years ago
Location: Middleburg, Fla., U.S. of A.

#157

Post by Cmdr.Ron » 7 years ago

Hey "Knucklehead" -
Things still work fine. Haven't made any further changes except having the IP rebuilt. Veg oil is not nice. $1000.
Glad they work & curious about a detail or 2, if yer in an explainin' sort of mind, that is.
Why the IP re-build? & Was unheated veg oil a crust culprit?
Thanks, Sir,
Shalom! :)
'82 Datsun 720 SD22, '81 Toyota HiLux (proj)'77 Fiat 124 Spider trike project.
The Blessing of Abraham is mine.

dn29626
Posts: 249
Joined: 10 years ago
Location: Anderson, SC

#158

Post by dn29626 » 7 years ago

Knucklehead wrote:Veg oil is not nice. $1000.

...why is anyone looking at this site?
Please explain these two comments.
82 King Cab 2wd (nice)
82 Reg Cab (body damage)
Anderson , SC
Since Fall 2009

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Knucklehead
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Joined: 14 years ago
Location: Phoenix

#159

Post by Knucklehead » 7 years ago

First, what I said was "I still recommend a turbo, but only if you like tinkering. If not, why is anyone looking at this site?" That is, if you don't like tinkering, why would you be looking at this site? For that matter, if you don't like tinkering, why would anyone own a vehicle that's older than a warranty?

Yes, the IP required a rebuild because of WVO usage. Yes, I used LOTS of it, and I'm sure it paid for itself. But the fact remains, WVO is not nice, at any temperature, just too much acid and other unknowns regardless of filtering. New VO might be ok, but at way more $ than #2, why? Biodiesel that passes all service standards seems to be ok, ie, it has no acids or unknowns.

WVO also wore out the old style mechanical pump on my Cummins, but again, I ran many thousands of gallons. I would say it cut the life of my IPs to one fourth or less. Never would I consider it on a modern high tech IP, not even one tankful.
'82 standard cab 3 axle SD22 turbo
'89 int'l 9700 Cummins 444 (855 ci)
'29 HD FD export model

dn29626
Posts: 249
Joined: 10 years ago
Location: Anderson, SC

#160

Post by dn29626 » 7 years ago

Just so you know, i have been running vo in my 2001 F350 (which i purchased new) since 2003 (10 years so far).
82 King Cab 2wd (nice)
82 Reg Cab (body damage)
Anderson , SC
Since Fall 2009

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asavage
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#161

Post by asavage » 7 years ago

I'm with Galen on WVO. Too, too many fine diesel vehicles have been scrapped due to premature wear due to bad fuel (of all kinds). I've been involved with enough to advise "Just Say No".

That's not to say that it can't be done, and even done well. But there are issues even done right. And let me bring up acrolein again, too.
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.

dn29626
Posts: 249
Joined: 10 years ago
Location: Anderson, SC

#162

Post by dn29626 » 7 years ago

Guys, i agree there are issues with running vo, but if you are willing to tinker (which includes extra parts and maintenance), it will work.

My $0.02 on the subject. Moving on (i hope).
82 King Cab 2wd (nice)
82 Reg Cab (body damage)
Anderson , SC
Since Fall 2009

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Knucklehead
Posts: 148
Joined: 14 years ago
Location: Phoenix

#163

Post by Knucklehead » 7 years ago

I'm sorry dn, I get what you are saying now about tinkering. Yes it was fun for a while. Yes I'm glad I did it. Yes I learned a lot. Yes, I'm sure it paid for itself, but only because I ran so much in the big rig. But you also have to understand I moved so much of the nasty stuff that I got truly sick of it and the smell and the mess it made. It's not fun anymore. I want to make things run better and look prettier, not wear them out and goo them up. Now I'd rather smelt my own metal than make my own fuel. I guess I just want something different for my tinkering efforts.
'82 standard cab 3 axle SD22 turbo
'89 int'l 9700 Cummins 444 (855 ci)
'29 HD FD export model

Zarghareth
Posts: 19
Joined: 8 years ago
Location: Sisters, OR

#164

Post by Zarghareth » 7 years ago

Hi everyone,
I figured I ought to share the outcomes of my SD22 turbo build seeing as this undead thread has kind of become the greatest archive available on the internet of info about turboing SD22's. Another reason for this post is that its seems like, toward the end of this thread, moral is pretty low about trubo builds on these engines. DON'T GIVE UP HOPE! Your SD22 is a diamond just waiting to be cut! Unfortunately I have no idea how to post pictures on this forum so if anyone wants to see, all they have to do is tell me how. :P

A general description:
I have the throttle body in its original position with the vacuum line from it's venturi generator going to its original position on the injection pump. I am running a standard T3 turbo with no wastegate. Output from compressor is ducted directly to throttle body with a 44mm BOV in between. Turbo oil is supplied by belt driven HTP rear-end pump scavenging from the oil-pan and supplying the turbo and accompanying oil accumulator. Oil pressure regulator returns excess to oil-pan. Turbo drains directly into 1/2 npt bung in oil pan.

This rig is my daily and runs great. very reliable with huge power gains over stock. I am running some pretty awful death juice in it to get the most out of it but in exchange for the 4-12 psi I now have on tap, its a pleasure having to put in lots of additive religiously. I am currently going to OSU for Mechanical Engineering and this build works so well and has been so satisfying to me that I intend on continuing to do more and more to optimize my system even after I graduate and start raking in the dough instead of getting a sports car. I believe that with inter-cooling in addition to an electronic IP control unit controlled in turn by a custom ECU gathering data from exhaust and intake gas temperature sensors, O2 sensors, MAF sensor, PSI sensors, and RPM sensor, I will be able to start getting some real HP out of my little baby. I am also considering water injection and possibly even nitrous oxide. I'd be happy to elaborate on any of the stuff I've done or plan to do.
Last edited by Zarghareth 7 years ago, edited 4 times in total.

Zarghareth
Posts: 19
Joined: 8 years ago
Location: Sisters, OR

#165

Post by Zarghareth » 7 years ago

So I was just looking through the later parts of the tread more carefully and I hadn't realized there was so much confusion about the fuel regulation system before my previous post. I believe I can give a good explanation of how the stock governor works and how to set it up to make it work with a turbo.

NOTE: I am referring to the BOSCH KIKI pump.
Basically, the way the joint diaphragm-mechanical governor on the SD22 in the 720 is: if you open the throttle, more air is allowed to bypass the venturi generator located in the throttle body, thus decreasing the vacuum being applied to the diaphragm on the IP and subsequently increasing the amount of fuel delivered to the engine. Because of this, it is essential that the hose from the TB go to the correct side of the diaphragm. The mechanical governor just keeps RPM stable.
The reason why this system is set up using vacuum and diaphragm mechanism is very important. It dampens the movement of the regulating mechanism inside of the pump which is very sensitive and must exist constantly in a dynamic state. This is achieved by the diaphragm's inherent elastic properties and the "loose" actuation of it by the vacuum supplied from the throttle body. "Loose" meaning not capable of overly violent changes or holding 100% static.

With all of this in mind one can see how important it is to set up the throttle body and associated plumbing correctly. The main reason for leaving the TB in its stock position is that it measures the velocity of air moving through the engine and therefore, indirectly, volume not pressure. With the installation of a turbo, the velocity of air moving into the engine is much greater and thereby the vacuum being applied to the regulatory diaphragm is much greater, that is if you install the TB pre-turbo. With the TB post turbo, the pressure of the air in the intake system negates this increase in vacuum while still producing the low vacuum required by the IP control mechanism. In addition, it detracts greatly from turbo spool rates to have such a significant restriction before the turbo.

If you simply leave the throttle body in its stock position with the hose from the throttle body connecting to the rearmost hose barb on the IP and the forward hose barb on the IP open to atmosphere, It should work great. At least it has for me.

If you actually read all of that I really hope that it helps!
Last edited by Zarghareth 7 years ago, edited 4 times in total.

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