Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Article I

SD diesels were widely available in the US in the 1981-86 Datsun/Nissan 720 pickups, and in Canada through '87 in the D21 pickup.

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Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Article I

#1

Post by philip »

Shortly, the new reformulated Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel will be here. The all mechanical injection systems on our Nissan SD engines were NEVER intended for fuel with such low lubricity. What to do? The short answer is the addition of a diesel lubricity additive with EVERY refueling. Not an option anymore.

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-Philip
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1982 Datsun 720KC SD-22

"Im slow and I'm ahead of you"
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#2

Post by asavage »

Yup. Point No. 6, post 168. For our part of the world, as in others, biodiesel will likely be the lubricity additive of choice. It's even price-competitive for a change.

However, refiners, distributors, and blenders are going to meet the ASTM std for lubricity in their own ways, depending on local and market conditions, so how any particular tankful of fuel meets the minimum lubricity is unknown.

As to consumers adding their own additives at the tank -- then, as now, it won't be necessary. Esp. in our low-pressure IPs, the tolerances aren't so tight that our IPs will "see" a difference. The 25000 PSI systems are going to be a lot more sensitive to low lubricity levels than ours.

The move to ULSD was accomplished in other countries long ago, and there is a plethora of data WRT their experience. The primary one that affects us is Bosch VE IP seal failures (see other threads on this topic, including viton replacement seal materials).
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.
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#3

Post by philip »

asavage wrote:Yup. Point No. 6, post 168. For our part of the world, as in others, biodiesel will likely be the lubricity additive of choice. It's even price-competitive for a change.

However, refiners, distributors, and blenders are going to meet the ASTM std for lubricity in their own ways, depending on local and market conditions, so how any particular tankful of fuel meets the minimum lubricity is unknown.

As to consumers adding their own additives at the tank -- then, as now, it won't be necessary. Esp. in our low-pressure IPs, the tolerances aren't so tight that our IPs will "see" a difference. SNIP
Al: When I had my injectors rebuilt recently, the rebuilder (authorized Bosch/Zexel/Stanadyne/Rotomaster rebuilder) went into some detail and showed me a Zexel advisory about the new ULSD as it would affect various systems. The recommendation was that UNTIL such time as field feedback confirms 15ppm fuel as delivered had adequate lubricity in any system, that a lubricity additive be used in high speed diesels. Seems Zexel is of the mind that 15ppm is suitable for the coming generation fuel systems only.

The above article mentions the Swedish experience with 10ppm fuel back in 1989. Systems prevalent back then were low pressure systems like the SDs have.

I CAN tell you there is a perceptable difference in engine operation using PowerService mixed at 1oz per 2.5 gallons (US). Whether the difference is from improved lubricity or from centane improvement I cannot say. I should try a lubricity agent that has no centane improver and compare. :wink:
-Philip
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My friend, you are missed . . .

1982 Datsun 720KC SD-22

"Im slow and I'm ahead of you"
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#4

Post by asavage »

While I don't doubt that diesel injection component mfgrs & rebuilders are touting additives -- they always have -- but when the US went LSD in about 1990, the lesson was learned in the US, and ULSD is a lot steeper decline in sulfur. I trust (really, I do) that the supply chain is now informed about the lubricity issue in a way that they weren't sixteen years ago.

And, since I always run some blend of BD, it's a non-issue for me :) Now, if I could just get rid of all these danged leaks . . . .
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.
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#5

Post by philip »

asavage wrote:While I don't doubt that diesel injection component mfgrs & rebuilders are touting additives -- they always have -- but when the US went LSD in about 1990, the lesson was learned in the US, and ULSD is a lot steeper decline in sulfur. I trust (really, I do) that the supply chain is now informed about the lubricity issue in a way that they weren't sixteen years ago.

And, since I always run some blend of BD, it's a non-issue for me :) Now, if I could just get rid of all these danged leaks . . . .
As I messaged you privately, mixing 2% biodiesel (one gallon of B99 costing $5.60 at the moment) treats 50 gallons of D2. A quart of PowerService costing $5.50 treats 50 gallons at the stronger mixing recommendation. PowerService is available at every Wal*Mart.

Agreed, there is a long history of diesel fuel additives, much more so than gasoline. Biocides, anti-gel, lubricity, centane improvers, etc. With all that in mind, I put my bet that the industry will blend to the lowest common denominator setforth by government edict .... a government I do not trust. The words Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) should make my point.

I did ask specifically if the replacement injector nozzles had metalurgy mindful of Low Sulfur and the new Ultra Low Sulfur fuels. The diesel shop guy said "I have never recieved any bulletins to that effect."
-Philip
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My friend, you are missed . . .

1982 Datsun 720KC SD-22

"Im slow and I'm ahead of you"
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#6

Post by philip »

asavage wrote:While I don't doubt that diesel injection component mfgrs & rebuilders are touting additives -- they always have -- but when the US went LSD in about 1990, the lesson was learned in the US, and ULSD is a lot steeper decline in sulfur. SNIP
Earlier in the week, I discovered and bought this STP product. It's no different than any other diesel lubricity restorer but for ... the absence of any claim to increase cetane. Says 32oz treats 150 gallons. That works out to 1oz per 4.6 gallons. $8.

So far (300 miles) I like the results. Cold engine combustion cackle is less than it was using PowerService.

(Note: in the following week, I've found out this stuff is rare and may have been discontinued by STP. Scroll down to a very similar product I found).

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Last edited by philip 15 years ago, edited 3 times in total.
-Philip
Passed 08May2008
My friend, you are missed . . .

1982 Datsun 720KC SD-22

"Im slow and I'm ahead of you"
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#7

Post by philip »

This is the authorized "Stanadyne Lubricity Forumula". It has NO cetane improver and is widely available through diesel repair outlets." 16oz bottle treats 120 gallons. That works out to 1oz per 7.5 gallons. Price paid was $8.50

One thing I noticed right away upon opening the bottle is the strong "stench" of moth balls and sulfur, something like hypoid gear oil. Euewwww!

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-Philip
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My friend, you are missed . . .

1982 Datsun 720KC SD-22

"Im slow and I'm ahead of you"
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#8

Post by philip »

http://www.npra.org/issues/fuels/diesel_sulfur.cfm

Highway Diesel

Under regulations previously adopted by EPA, the petroleum refining industry faces a June 2006 deadline to comply with stringent limitations on the sulfur content of highway diesel fuel. By this date, most refiners must meet a 15 parts per million (ppm) standard for at least 80% of the highway diesel fuel produced, with a 500 ppm cap on the remaining 20% of their production. By 2010, all highway diesel fuel must meet a 15 ppm cap.

The General Accounting Office (GAO) was requested by Congress to, among other items, obtain stakeholders’ views on the readiness of technology for the 2007 Highway Diesel standards along with EPA’s efforts to ensure compliance. GAO released their report titled “EPA Could Take Additional Steps to Help Maximize the Benefits from the 2007 Diesel Emissions Standards” on March 11th.

GAO’s findings confirm NPRA’s belief that while the refining industry is technologically capable and very much on target to produce the ULSD fuel, concerns remain that the fuel may not be available on a nation-wide basis. In addition, GOA agrees with NPRA in suggesting that it may be difficult to maintain the sulfur limits as the ULSD is transported throughout the liquid fuels distribution system.

GAO also reports that the nation’s trucking companies are not convinced that the new standards can be implemented on time and without serious problems. They point toward recent reports that engine technology required to coincide with ULSD may not be available as previously predicted by the engine manufacturers. While the refining industry is committed to on-time compliance with the standards, we have continually urged EPA to ensure that the requisite engine technology was well-proven and widely available before requiring the costly production of ULSD required in fueling the vehicles.
-Philip
Passed 08May2008
My friend, you are missed . . .

1982 Datsun 720KC SD-22

"Im slow and I'm ahead of you"
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#9

Post by Zoltan »

Hopefully diesel fuel makers will have the brains to blend in lubricants into the new ULSP. Meanwhile, if you mix in as low as 2% biodiesel, you're "lubed". See

http://www.biodiesel.com/why_biodiesel.htm

under Practical alternative for Marine Market.
- Zoltan -
________________________________
'82 Datsun 720 SD22 California model
'86 Ford Escort 2.0L Diesel
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philip
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#10

Post by philip »

Zoltan wrote:Hopefully diesel fuel makers will have the brains to blend in lubricants into the new ULSP. Meanwhile, if you mix in as low as 2% biodiesel, you're "lubed". See

http://www.biodiesel.com/why_biodiesel.htm
Ok, the passage is:

"-Biodiesel is easier on engines. Biodiesel blended as low as a 2% rate with low sulfer or ultra-low sulfer petroleum diesel increases lubricity to traditional high sulfur diesel fuel levels. Field tests indicate that engine life is increased with biodiesel usage"

I have a practical problem with biodiesel. First let me say that I have run B100 once and B20 quite a few times (the former comes in 5 gallon pales, the latter from a fuel island pump).

The COST of buying B100 in the Los Angeles area is completely prohibitive. Presently (April '06), B100 is $3.75 per gallon PLUS a $5 charge for the container. 4-5 months ago, B100 was $4.25 PLUS the $5 container!! No thanks.

Currently (4/23/06), B20 from a fuel island pump from the same source (Spirit Truck Stop in Cudahy, CA)(Los Angeles area) retails for the same price as #2 diesel ($3.05 per gallon). And for me, there is an 80 mile round trip. With luck, there will be a local SC Fuels location carrying B20 this coming summer. That location will be only minutes away. But if the price is still jacked up, I will continue buying #2 and doctoring it with lubricity improver.

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In the meantime, I'm using up the STP lubricity additive and when exhausted (soon), moving to the Stanadyne product.
Last edited by philip 15 years ago, edited 3 times in total.
-Philip
Passed 08May2008
My friend, you are missed . . .

1982 Datsun 720KC SD-22

"Im slow and I'm ahead of you"
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philip
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#11

Post by philip »

fud2468 wrote:What is off road diesel?
Ray Mac.
Off Road diesel is:

1) a diesel motor fuel that has not been taxed. Typical use is commercial earth moving equipment and portable diesel pumps and generators.

2) a diesel motor fuel that has a red dye in it so if you get caught misfueling a road vehicle, you're screwed.

3) a diesel motor fuel that has a higher kerosene content which ... lowers its cloud point in cold weather to about 20 degrees F.

4) the additional kerosene content also lowers the fuel's lubricity. Not a desireable characteristic in hot weather and in all mechanical fuel systems.
Last edited by philip 15 years ago, edited 1 time in total.
-Philip
Passed 08May2008
My friend, you are missed . . .

1982 Datsun 720KC SD-22

"Im slow and I'm ahead of you"
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#12

Post by fud2468 »

Thanks, wbut am wondering why it was being sold in a gas station so a person could easily pump it into a vehicle just like the taxed diesel and save some money.
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#13

Post by asavage »

philip wrote:1) a diesel motor fuel that has not been taxed.
I think you meant "road tax". I think that the fuel's selling price includes one or more taxes, but that the road tax isn't one of them. But I could be wrong.
Regards,
Al S.

1982 Maxima diesel wagon, 2nd & 4th owner, 165k miles, rusty & burgundy/grey. Purchased 1996, SOLD 16Feb10
1983 Maxima diesel wagon, 199k miles, rusty, light yellow/light brown. SOLD 14Jul07
1981 720 SD22 (scrapped 04Sep07)
1983 Sentra CD17, 255k, bought 06Jul08, gave it away 22Jun10.
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philip
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#14

Post by philip »

asavage wrote:
philip wrote:1) a diesel motor fuel that has not been taxed.
I think you meant "road tax". I think that the fuel's selling price includes one or more taxes, but that the road tax isn't one of them. But I could be wrong.
Depends. Stationary equipment qualifies for a refund of all taxes paid as does heavy off-road only equipment. The tax exemption varies by state.
-Philip
Passed 08May2008
My friend, you are missed . . .

1982 Datsun 720KC SD-22

"Im slow and I'm ahead of you"
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#15

Post by Zoltan »

Yeah, biodiesel is not readily available most places. Oahu residents are lucky because Pacific Biodiesel has a refinery here. Their price, $2.91, has been long time cheaper than the dino diesel, which is $3.34 at places.

Off road diesel is, I guess, the kind that goes into your tractor and dyed red. You get a tax brake if you use diesel for agriculture and fishing.
- Zoltan -
________________________________
'82 Datsun 720 SD22 California model
'86 Ford Escort 2.0L Diesel
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